A Guide To Bad Weather Driving

car being driven in bad driving conditions with snow

As we move towards the colder months, the weather conditions start to cause a problem for even the most experienced of drivers. So, it is always a good idea to be prepared and ready to tackle the roads, no matter what conditions you find yourself in. After all, you never really know when the weather is going to take a turn for the worse.

Of course, in case you do get into difficulties, you need to make sure you are properly covered by being a member of an accident recovery service and finding cheap car insurance that protects you against various incidents. But, here are a few ways that you give yourself the best odds of preventing yourself getting into an accident.

Snowy or Icy Roads

toy car in snow depicting bad weather drivingPhoto Credit

The first thing that you need to do is slow down – roughly 10 miles per hour below the speed limit is a good rough guideline to follow. If you still don’t feel in control, take another 5mph off. Though black ice is extremely difficult to spot, it tends to form on bridges or the shadows of tall buildings so be wary when you are driving around these areas. Avoid tailgating by giving yourself at least 100 yards between you and the car in front. Don’t brake during a turn and if you do start to skid, make sure to always turn into it.

Foggy Conditions

foggy road depicting bad weather drivingPhoto Credit

If the visibility is significantly reduced because of fog, the first thing that you need to do is turn on the fog lights. These yellow lights are designed cut through fog better than standard white lamps. They are also low to the ground which helps to better illuminate the road in front of you. Before you enter a fog bank, pump the brakes as this alerts vehicles close behind you that they need to back off. If you are driving over the crest of a hill, you need to be extra cautious as you won’t be able to spot any stationary vehicles.

Rainy Weather

rain bouncing off a surfacePhoto Credit

Like driving in snowy or icy conditions, you should slow down by a minimum of 5 to 10 miles per hour as when the rain starts to pour, you are at an increased risk of aquaplaning. If this does happen, don’t make any rash braking or steering decisions as it should only last for a couple of seconds. If an area in front of you looks like it has accumulated a lot of water, you should avoid driving through it as it is very difficult to gauge the depth of it. After you have driven through a puddle, you should feather the brakes to create heat and friction which will help to dry them out.

Hopefully, this advice will help you out on the roads during the winter months. Taking these necessary precautions will make it less likely that you will get into an accident. Of course, you can never be 100 percent safe, but you can still reduce your risk of getting into problems.

*A COLLABORATIVE POST*
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