Preparing Your Kids for the Future

There is a general acceptance of what kids will say when you ask them what they want to be when they grow up. It’s usually a doctor, veterinarian, firefighter, teacher, or dancer. And that will shift slightly when they grow up. Nowadays we are not surprised when they would say YouTube influencer or blogger. And children should be allowed to dream, play, and learn; there is no need to go all ‘tiger mom’ and drag them from ballet to piano lessons to extra maths lessons. You could, however, positively encourage traits for them develop.

A love of learning. Make learning challenging, engaging, and fun. Kids are naturally inquisitive if you give them the right tools to learn and let them explore you will instil them with routine and methods to continuously better themselves. If they ask a question, and if it is suitable, let them find out the answer themselves. Not only will that create a mechanism of self-sufficiency, the reward will not only be the answer itself but also the journey of getting to that result.

source

Being able to reflect and have self-knowledge. Part of this is self-confidence, the other part is humility. Without much help from you, kids will feel like Master of The Universe, and rightfully so. And as they grow older, they will make mistakes, have their confidence dented and eat a healthy portion of humble pie. The challenging part of all this is to ensure it’s not just trading confidence for humility but to make a connection between that what they know and that what they don’t, and the only way to uncover this is by talking to people, listening and be willing to learn.

And the previous leads to the next one, making connections. Children will be naturally self-focused and usually quite perceptive of atmospheres and moods but looking through another person’s perspective can be challenging. This is not restricted to peers, but also other age levels. Awareness of the world around them helps kids become strong collaborators in the future.

Learning is not restricted to school.

The environment outside school is arguably a more significant influence on your child’s upbringing. Seeing and learning from the world in person helps expands a child’s reference framework and creates an increased capacity to make connections. A day at the beach if you live inland, a day in a small town if you live in an urban environment, a different country, all things that will, even subconsciously, start to become part of a child’s capacity to learn.

Goal setting and focus. It can start small, from tidy your room today and the reward will be two bedtime stories, or, especially when they are older, do the dishes for a week, and you get some pocket money. In a world where everything seems instant, it seems critical to nurture the idea of effort and patience versus rewards. Take those standard children’s future professions answers for example and find them amongst UK’s hardest jobs. One of the most valuable things to learn is that good things come to those who wait.

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.