Making Your Home More Accessible

a row of houses - moving to a new home

I am quite lucky that Olivia and I really healthy and touch wood, don’t usually require any ongoing treatment for health-related conditions. Sure, I do suffer from back pain and joint pain, however, at this time it is manageable and I see no further major change in this in the future. But there are millions of people who do live with serious health conditions that require their homes and even vehicles to be adapted so they are able to continue on with their lives with as much independence as possible.

Living with a physical disability has a huge impact on a person’s everyday life. Not being able to do things others take for granted shouldn’t be a hindrance to the way they live their lives. Making some carefully thought out adaptations around the home can really be beneficial to restoring independence and making life easier.

Transport.

Before we talk about the home, being able to get out and about is so important for anyone and being in a wheelchair or requiring further assistance to get out shouldn’t be any harder than it needs to be. Allied Vehicles have a range of wheelchair adapted vehicles meaning you can travel safely as the driver or passenger.

Making Your Home More Accessible.

Not all disabilities are visible and making your home more accessible is dependant on the requirements you need. There are many different options to consider and these can range from low cost to expensive based on your circumstances.

Handrails can be a big help placed around the home for those who need extra assistance with mobility. Placing them around the home, on corners, stairs or inside/outside external doors can help those needing extra help with navigating corners or stairs or just for extra support. Alternatively, a stair lift may give an extra piece of mind when using stairs to travel around the home. If stairs between rooms or outside external doors are an issue, consider installing ramps to make them more accessible.

a closed in wooden staircase with handrail

The use of a rising or reclining chair is also an idea for if sitting and standing are proving difficult. A rising chair will move with you to help you stand easier to get in and back up from sitting position.

If moving around your home becomes difficult you may want to consider changing the internal structure of your home. By taking down walls or making doorframes wider you can make your home more accessible. For bigger adaptations like this, you may be able to get support from your local council to assist with the funding to make these changes. This is also worth considering should you need to move or change your bathroom. Installing a wetroom can make a bathroom much more user-friendly for someone who finds getting in and out of a bath hard or who is unable to use them.

Low-Cost Changes.

open plan room with corner sofa and modern furniture

Ultimately making huge changes around the home can be expensive. Whilst this will be necessary for some homes, there are also many other low-cost changes you can make to your daily routine and to your home to help make it more accessible. Of course, this is all based on the specific adaptations you require to help you navigate your home as easily as possible.

How about moving furniture to create more space to move around in? This can help if you need room to accommodate a wheelchair or even make the room easier to navigate.

Things like having a reacher tool to hand to help access items that are hard to reach. Having pull cords or moving light switches/electrical sockets to an easier to reach place. Remove rugs from around the home should they be causing a trip hazard or are restricting movements in a room or around the home. The use of smart technology could also be an advantage too. Certain household items can be controlled via voice commands thus reducing the need to do this task physically. eg turning lights on and off.

There are many ways you can adapt your home to make it more accessible for everyone living there regardless of your situation.

*disclaimer: a collaborative post*
Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.